PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOR

"Get positive herpes and fuck the world." --- Aubrey Marcus

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catonhottinroof:

Henri Le Sidaner

The Communicant

You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.

John Berger, Ways of Seeing  (via ii-sm)

this reminds me–on occasion i will post a female nude painted by a woman and tag it #women paint the best nudes. an opinion i have some conviction on. invariably this will fill my dash with some nice nudes painted by men. i’m not saying male painters can’t paint. i’m saying that often the female nude as painted from the male gaze presents the subject like a sandwich. *something* for eating an object not a subject. female nudes where the subject is seen with a compassionate eye, having self-posession and strength are almost invariably painted by women.

(via ringtales)

Rockets and Revenge (Dispatch 7)

For a few years, a young radical group of Israeli settlers in the West Bank have committed random acts of violence and vandalization against Palestinians and their property to make them pay the price for affronting their way of life. They call themselves “Pricetaggers,” and they’ve largely avoided prosecution by Israeli authorities.

VICE News gets rare access to the young members of the Price Tag movement — at the homecoming of Moriah Goldberg, 20, who just finished a three-month sentence for throwing stones at Palestinians. She and her family remain proud of the act, even as the current conflict in Gaza was sparked after an all-too-familiar round of retributive violence.

mattyhis:

art-history:


Vincent van GoghDutch, 1853-1890
Shoes, 1888
Oil on canvas18 x 21¾ in. (45.7 x 55.2 cm)
Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, New York, USA


van Gogh x Vans S/S 15

mattyhis:

art-history:

Vincent van Gogh
Dutch, 1853-1890

Shoes, 1888

Oil on canvas
18 x 21¾ in. (45.7 x 55.2 cm)

Metropolitan Museum of Art
New York, New York, USA

van Gogh x Vans S/S 15

pre-raphaelisme:

Charity by George Frederic Watts, 1898.

Science Not Fear - Drug Policy and Medical Research: Virginia Wright at TEDxSantaCruz

Director for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelics Studies (MAPS) Virginia Wright makes the case for legislating drug policy based on science, rather than fear.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC:  I came across this Warhol portrait of Robert Rauschenberg the other week in Andrea Caratsch’s gallery in Zurich. I was shocked to find that one of the most significant works of the 20th century was selling for less than $2 million – maybe five per cent of what less important, later Warhols can fetch. Last I checked, it still had not been bought. (Caratsch wouldn’t take my Sam’s Club card.)

Made in 1962, this is, as far as I can tell, the earliest portrait of a living sitter in Warhol’s mature career, and one of his very earliest silkscreens. (I don’t count his movie-star images as portraits: They are closer to Rembrandt’s “heads” of Aristotle or Jesus.) That means this work is a first experiment in the genre that filled the final two-thirds of Warhol’s career.

The 1962 portrait features one of the cutting-edge artists that Warhol was most keen on emulating, and whose friendship he had only just managed to win. Average museumgoers, and even experts, don’t always realize how deeply committed Warhol was to the classic, egghead avant-garde, and how deeply immersed he was in it at this point in his career; this portrait stands as his declaration of that commitment. It also comes at just the moment when Warhol was able to turn the tables on Rauschenberg, by offering to help his elder learn the new photo-silkscreen technique. (Although the tale’s also told that Rauschenberg taught him.)

Rauschenberg was also some kind of model for Warhol of what it was to be a successful gay artist, even if he had once rejected Warhol as too “swish” for his tastes. I think you can read Rauschenberg’s un-swish-ness from the way Warhol depicts him here, in an image that has none of the camp playfulness of Warhol’s Pop works from this era. Drowning in a deep-blue sea, Rauschenberg has stronger echoes in this portrait of his own Black Paintings, or of Warhol’s later “Disasters”, than of Warhol’s “Troy Donohue” or “Marilyn” silkscreens. You could almost read this dour, barely-there portrait as being in mourning for, or at least a token of, Rauschenberg’s closeted life. With its figure small and lost, gazing up into the heavens, this is one of the most wistful images Warhol ever made. All that blackness, and the filmic stutters running down the surface of the work, remind me most of Warhol’s dark and cryptic “Shadow” silkscreens from 1978.

The painting also comes close to being a direct quote from the all-blue monochromes of Yves Klein. Warhol cannot have missed the Frenchman’s 1961 New York show with Leo Castelli, who became Warhol’s own dealer not long after.  (A couple of years later, Warhol was asking a lover, the art historian Robert Pincus-Witten, to tell him what Klein was like.) Klein is one of the few artists of this era who can rival Warhol for his mix of brainy profundity and absurdist play, and this portrait almost proves the connection. Within a year or two, Warhol was including Kleinian monochromes in his silkscreened diptychs; this earlier “Rauschenberg” can almost be thought of as a collapsed diptych, with a silkscreen portrait sandwiched on top of a blue monochrome. Which means there’s also cancelling-out going on – a deliberate attempt to make a portrait that conceals more than it shows. Warhol may have admired and envied Bob Rauschenberg, but more than anything he wanted to cast the shadow of his own art over his new friend’s. This darkling portrait casts that shadow, symbolically, before Warhol had made a whole lot of art that could actually outshine Rauschenberg’s. (Image courtesy Andrea Caratsch, © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

discoveringdavinci:

Leonardo became almost obsessed with the ideas of destruction in the last couple years of his life. He drew these scenes of a deluge ravaging the earth. Casually glancing at them they appear to be just squiggly doodles or waves but if you look more closely they are filled with details. Tree’s, ruins, buildings. Some framing lines are left along some of the paper’s back edges, alluding that they were intended to be finished works - or that even though they do not seem very clear or ‘finished’ they were intended to look this way. 

'Let there be represented the summit of a rugged mountain with valleys surrounding its base, and on its sides let the surface of the soil be seen to slide, together with the small roots of the bushes, denuding great portions of the surrounding rocks … and let the mountains as they are laid bare reveal the deep fissures made in them by ancient earthquakes … And into the depth of some valley may have fallen the fragments of a mountain, forming a shore to the swollen waters of its river, which, having already burst its banks, will rush on in monstrous waves; and the greatest will strike upon and destroy the walls of the cities and farmhouses in the valley.

Trees and plants must be bent to the ground, almost as if they would follow the course of the gale, with their branches twisted out of their natural growth and their leaves tossed and turned about. Of the men who are there some must have fallen to the ground and be entangled in their garments, and hardly to be recognized for the dust, while those who remain standing may be behind some tree, with their arms around it that the wind may not tear them away; others with their hand over their eyes for the dust, bending to the ground with their clothes and hair streaming in the wind.’ - Leonardo da Vinci 

"Of Leonardo’s many drawings of deluges made at this time, ten are uniform in size and style, but not in technique - most are in black chalk only, though all are as meticulously worked up as the present sheet, which is finished with the pen to give a remarkably formal, measured quality to the destruction. Huge cubic blocks of a mountain arch over to crash down at the centre, sending curling waves of debris shooting out like shock-waves to blast the landscape along the lower edge of the sheet. Yet the dual nature of these drawings - both visionary and theoretical - is confirmed by the dispassionate inscription hidden among the clouds at the top, which reads:" (Holbein to Hockney:)

'Of rain. You will show the degrees of falling rain at various distances and of varying degrees of obscurity, and let the darkest part be closest to the middle of its thickness.'

We are forever told that America has a free press, except when it comes to Israel, and then it is obviously an open gov’t propaganda agency.
Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin (via america-wakiewakie)

descentintotyranny:

Israel using flechette shells in Gaza

Palestinian human rights group accuses Israel military of using shells that spray out thousand of tiny and potentially lethal darts

July 20 2014

The Israeli military is using flechette shells, which spray out thousands of tiny and potentially lethal metal darts, in its military operation in Gaza.

Six flechette shells were fired towards the village of Khuzaa, east of Khan Younis, on 17 July, according to the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights. Nahla Khalil Najjar, 37, suffered injuries to her chest, it said. PCHR provided a picture of flechettes taken by a fieldworker last week.

The Israel Defence Forces (IDF) did not deny using the shells in the conflict. “As a rule, the IDF only employs weapons that have been determined lawful under international law, and in a manner which fully conforms with the laws of armed conflict,” a spokesperson said in response to a request for specific comment on the deployment of flechettes.

B’Tselem, an Israeli human rights organisation, describes a flechette shell as “an anti-personnel weapon that is generally fired from a tank. The shell explodes in the air and releases thousands of metal darts 37.5mm in length, which disperse in a conical arch 300 metres long and about 90 metres wide”.

The munitions are not prohibited under international humanitarian law, but according to B’Tselem, “other rules of humanitarian law render their use in the Gaza Strip illegal. One of the most fundamental principles is the obligation to distinguish between those who are involved and those who are not involved in the fighting, and to avoid to the extent possible injury to those who are not involved. Deriving from this principle is the prohibition of the use of an imprecise weapon which is likely to result in civilian injuries.”

The legality of flechette munitions was upheld by the Israeli supreme court in 2002, and according to an Israeli military source, they are particularly effective against enemy fighters operating in areas covered by vegetation.

The source said a number of armies around the world deploy flechette shells, and that they were intended solely for use against legitimate military targets in accordance with international law.

The IDF has deployed flechette shells in Gaza and Lebanon before. B’Tselem has documented the deaths of nine Palestinians in Gaza from flechettes in 2001 and 2002. Flechettes have also killed and wounded dozens of civilians, including women and children, in conflicts between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon.

The Israeli military deployed artillery shells containing white phosphorous in densely populated areas of Gaza during Operation Cast Lead in 2008 and 2009, causing scores of deaths and extensive burns. It initially issued a categorical denial of reports of the use of white phosphorous, but later admitted it, saying the weapon was only used to create smokescreens.

Human Rights Watch said its use of the munitions in Operation Cast Lead was indiscriminate and evidence of war crimes.

In response to a legal challenge, the IDF said last year it would “avoid the use in built-up areas of artillery shells containing white phosphorus, with two narrow exceptions.” The exceptions were not disclosed.

Read More

likeafieldmouse:

Mark Rothko - Red and Black (1968)

ragincontagion:

"Your circulatory system, from the aorta to arteries to arterioles to capillaries and back up the venous side form a similar continuum. They start off massive and branch and branch again, becoming smaller with each branching until they become so narrow in your capillaries that the red blood cells slowly flow through them single file just in order to fit. The mechanism of how your blood vessels branch is fractal in nature. Physiologically speaking your cells depend on oxygen, without it they die and if enough of them die, you die. In order to effectively oxygenate your tissues your circulatory system has to perform an impressive feat of dimensional architecture. Like the Koch Curve, packing infinite surface area into a finite space, your circulatory system utilizes fractal geometry through branching so that no cell in your body is never more than 3 or 4 cells away from a blood cell. And the amazing thing about this feat is that your blood vessels and blood take up very little space: no more than around 5% of your body!"
For more fractal physiology and chaos theory in medicine check out these past posts.

ragincontagion:

"Your circulatory system, from the aorta to arteries to arterioles to capillaries and back up the venous side form a similar continuum. They start off massive and branch and branch again, becoming smaller with each branching until they become so narrow in your capillaries that the red blood cells slowly flow through them single file just in order to fit. The mechanism of how your blood vessels branch is fractal in nature. Physiologically speaking your cells depend on oxygen, without it they die and if enough of them die, you die. In order to effectively oxygenate your tissues your circulatory system has to perform an impressive feat of dimensional architecture. Like the Koch Curve, packing infinite surface area into a finite space, your circulatory system utilizes fractal geometry through branching so that no cell in your body is never more than 3 or 4 cells away from a blood cell. And the amazing thing about this feat is that your blood vessels and blood take up very little space: no more than around 5% of your body!"

For more fractal physiology and chaos theory in medicine check out these past posts.