'When asked about how he could have offered the Warren Report, full of inconsistencies, to the American people with a straight face, Dulles is reported to have said, “The American people don't read.””
- - - Michael C. Ruppert

'When asked about how he could have offered the Warren Report, full of inconsistencies, to the American people with a straight face, Dulles is reported to have said, “The American people don't read.””

- - - Michael C. Ruppert

Al Qaeda is a creation of the CIA. It is simply a database of names of jihadists who were trained to fight against the Russians during the Afghan-Soviet conflict. * The real purpose is to build up a fake enemy so as to get the American public to support the invasion of Afghanistan, Iraq and now Pakistan. The whole objective is for Oil resources. The secondary objective is the conquest of the middle east for: New World Order, One World Government.

BBC (via mediaexposed)

It amazes me how few people know this, and it amazes me even more that we continue to create proxy-armies out of rebel factions and think that arming these people with high powered military weapons will have any other outcome than ruthless bloodshed.

Our own police force can’t use these weapons with any sort of responsible aim. How the hell do you suppose that guerrilla fighters would care how they use these weapons?

(via willbraham)

gandalf1202:

Léon Mathieu Cochereau - Interior of David’s Studio at the Collège des Quatre-Nations, Paris [1814-17] on Flickr.
A glimpse into the Paris studio of the famous painter Jacques-Louis David, this image shows 11 young men earnestly engaged in a life drawing and painting class. David stressed the importance of mastering drawing, his students, including the artist of this canvas, spent up to six hours a day sketching a live model. Because David had supported the French Revolution of 1789, he had to retire from public life when the monarchy was restored in 1814. To avoid touchy political issues, Cochereau did not include the figure of David when he painted an image of his master’s studio for exhibition at the 1814 Paris Salon. Instead, he suggested David’s presence with the draped easel prominently placed before the window. Cochereau was only 24 when he died at sea while on his way to Palestine. Consequently, he left few works behind. Two other versions of this painting are known, one in the Toledo Museum of Art, the other in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. [Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas]

gandalf1202:

Léon Mathieu Cochereau - Interior of David’s Studio at the Collège des Quatre-Nations, Paris [1814-17] on Flickr.

A glimpse into the Paris studio of the famous painter Jacques-Louis David, this image shows 11 young men earnestly engaged in a life drawing and painting class. David stressed the importance of mastering drawing, his students, including the artist of this canvas, spent up to six hours a day sketching a live model.

Because David had supported the French Revolution of 1789, he had to retire from public life when the monarchy was restored in 1814. To avoid touchy political issues, Cochereau did not include the figure of David when he painted an image of his master’s studio for exhibition at the 1814 Paris Salon. Instead, he suggested David’s presence with the draped easel prominently placed before the window.

Cochereau was only 24 when he died at sea while on his way to Palestine. Consequently, he left few works behind. Two other versions of this painting are known, one in the Toledo Museum of Art, the other in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas]

The gift economy represents a shift from consumption to contribution, transaction to trust, scarcity to abundance and isolation to community.

Charles Eisenstein (via starstuffgiftsblog)

Obama Tells the Nation That America Is Going Back to War in Iraq | VICE News

Thundercat + Eric Andre - “Tron Song” I $5K Videos

nprfreshair:

Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 
 

TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?
TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 
GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?
ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.



Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

nprfreshair:

Today’s interview is with Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times.  Arango has been reporting from Iraq for nearly five years, and has served as bureau chief since 2011, the year the U.S. completed its troop withdrawal from Iraq.  He’s watched the rise of the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, and the he’s covered the Iraqi government, which under the leadership of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, was seen as corrupt and sectarian, persecuting Sunnis. 

 

TERRY GROSS: Do you think that ISIS would’ve existited if not for the American invasion of Iraq?

TIM ARANGO: No, absolutely not. 

GROSS: How did the American invasion help create ISIS?

ARANGO: The Americans come to invade Iraq and I think it’s partly because the Sunnis are going to be out of power. The Americans come in and topple Saddam Hussein, who was Sunni, and there’s been a Sunni elite governing Iraq for centuries and they come in, the Sunnis realize they’re going to be left out of this, they’re not going to be running the country anymore, so resistance movements sprung up. The other thing the Americans did was disbanding the Iraqi army which created a whole group of would-be potential insurgents. So al-Qaida in Iraq is formed and many of the things that the Maliki government has done to alienate Sunnis they learned from the Americans. The Americans taught them how to exclude Sunnis from political life with de-Baathification and things like that. The other thing Maliki has done is these mass arrests of Sunni men and of suspected terrorists and that’s exactly what the Americans did. So as the Americans tried to fight these guys they would do these mass arrests and they could put them in places like [U.S. detention facility] Camp Bucca, most of the leaders of ISIS were in Camp Bucca and they got know each other, they got to plan, they got to hang out, and so every turn in the Iraq story now is the American legacy and the epic American failure in Iraq.

Photo:  Kurdish pesh merga fighters on Tuesday battled ISIS at a point east of Mosul secured with the help of United States airstrikes. 
Credit:  Jm Lopez/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images