Naomi Klein says this changes everything

our tragedy begins humid.
in a humid classroom.
with a humid text book. breaking into us.
stealing us from ourselves.
one poem. at a time.

it begins with shakespeare.

the hot wash.
the cool acid. of
dead white men and women. people.

each one a storm.

crashing. into our young houses.
making us islands. easy isolations.
until we are so beleaguered and
swollen
with a definition of poetry that is white skin and
not us.
that we tuck our scalding. our soreness.
behind ourselves and
learn
poetry.
as trauma. as violence. as erasure.
another place we do not exist.
another form of exile
where we should praise. honor. our own starvation.

the little bits of langston. phyllis wheatley.
and
angelou during black history month. are the crumbs. are the minor boats.
that give us slight rest.

to be waterdrugged into rejecting the nuances of
my own bursting
extraordinary
self.
and to have
this
be
called
education.

to take my name out of my name.
out of where my native poetry lives. in me.
and
replace it with keats. browning. dickson. wolf. joyce. wilde. wolfe. plath. bronte. hemingway. hughes. byron. frost. cummings. kipling. poe. austen. whitman. blake. longfellow. wordsworth. duffy. twain. emerson. yeats. tennyson. auden. thoreau. chaucer. thomas. raliegh. marlowe. burns. shelley. carroll. elliot…

(what is the necessity of a black child being this high off of whiteness.)

and so. we are here. brown babies. worshipping. feeding. the glutton that is white literature. even after it dies.


(years later. the conclusion:


shakespeare is relative.

white literature is relative.

that we are force fed the meat of
an animal
that our bodies will not recognize. as inherent nutrition.
is not relative.
is inert.)

the hot wash, nayyirah waheed

from ‘nejma’

(via nayyirahwaheed)

Nothing can replace the feel of the paper against your fingers, the ink soaked up by paper, the sensation of turning a page with the wind rustling your hair, or the deliberate and intricate presentation of images and text that you can only get in the real world, on real pages. And few things can be as torturous as sitting in front of a computer screen for hours on end.

CrimethInc

WTF with Marc Maron | Russell Brand


'When asked about how he could have offered the Warren Report, full of inconsistencies, to the American people with a straight face, Dulles is reported to have said, “The American people don't read.””
- - - Michael C. Ruppert

'When asked about how he could have offered the Warren Report, full of inconsistencies, to the American people with a straight face, Dulles is reported to have said, “The American people don't read.””

- - - Michael C. Ruppert

Al Qaeda is a creation of the CIA. It is simply a database of names of jihadists who were trained to fight against the Russians during the Afghan-Soviet conflict. * The real purpose is to build up a fake enemy so as to get the American public to support the invasion of Afghanistan, Iraq and now Pakistan. The whole objective is for Oil resources. The secondary objective is the conquest of the middle east for: New World Order, One World Government.

BBC (via mediaexposed)

It amazes me how few people know this, and it amazes me even more that we continue to create proxy-armies out of rebel factions and think that arming these people with high powered military weapons will have any other outcome than ruthless bloodshed.

Our own police force can’t use these weapons with any sort of responsible aim. How the hell do you suppose that guerrilla fighters would care how they use these weapons?

(via willbraham)

gandalf1202:

Léon Mathieu Cochereau - Interior of David’s Studio at the Collège des Quatre-Nations, Paris [1814-17] on Flickr.
A glimpse into the Paris studio of the famous painter Jacques-Louis David, this image shows 11 young men earnestly engaged in a life drawing and painting class. David stressed the importance of mastering drawing, his students, including the artist of this canvas, spent up to six hours a day sketching a live model. Because David had supported the French Revolution of 1789, he had to retire from public life when the monarchy was restored in 1814. To avoid touchy political issues, Cochereau did not include the figure of David when he painted an image of his master’s studio for exhibition at the 1814 Paris Salon. Instead, he suggested David’s presence with the draped easel prominently placed before the window. Cochereau was only 24 when he died at sea while on his way to Palestine. Consequently, he left few works behind. Two other versions of this painting are known, one in the Toledo Museum of Art, the other in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. [Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas]

gandalf1202:

Léon Mathieu Cochereau - Interior of David’s Studio at the Collège des Quatre-Nations, Paris [1814-17] on Flickr.

A glimpse into the Paris studio of the famous painter Jacques-Louis David, this image shows 11 young men earnestly engaged in a life drawing and painting class. David stressed the importance of mastering drawing, his students, including the artist of this canvas, spent up to six hours a day sketching a live model.

Because David had supported the French Revolution of 1789, he had to retire from public life when the monarchy was restored in 1814. To avoid touchy political issues, Cochereau did not include the figure of David when he painted an image of his master’s studio for exhibition at the 1814 Paris Salon. Instead, he suggested David’s presence with the draped easel prominently placed before the window.

Cochereau was only 24 when he died at sea while on his way to Palestine. Consequently, he left few works behind. Two other versions of this painting are known, one in the Toledo Museum of Art, the other in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

[Musée du Louvre, Paris - Oil on canvas]

The gift economy represents a shift from consumption to contribution, transaction to trust, scarcity to abundance and isolation to community.

Charles Eisenstein (via starstuffgiftsblog)

Obama Tells the Nation That America Is Going Back to War in Iraq | VICE News